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I had not been paying attention to this stuff lately.

Have to wake up more.

 

From an open letter by Maria Schneider:

 

"I and countless colleagues in these niche genres have learned painful lessons we’re not keen on repeating.

 

Lesson 1: The three major music companies that are locked and loaded to run the music licensing collective (let’s call it Corporation A) are the same companies that allowed themselves to be enticed by the self-serving Svengali, Daniel Ek, whose beginnings were built on infringement (uTorrent). The day Warner, Universal, and Sony bit a huge chunk of poison apple in the form of equity in Ek’s Spotify, they traded their contracted musicians’ and songwriters’ valuable creations for ads. That tectonic shift gave Ek most of the world’s music, it legitimized “free,” and it created a gaping conflict of interest for the Big 3.

 

Songwriters and attorneys argue if it was a “fiduciary breach.” In my opinion it is a massive breach of trust and ongoing conflict of interest. And as the 90% have suffered a huge collapse in income, inversely, we watch these companies celebrate their earnings from 10% of songs. That conflict of interest and breach of trust are very relevant to the MMA, and this history absolutely must not be ignored in writing the governance sections of the MMA. And, if that reality is painful or upsetting for industry to read, I can only answer that they themselves created it.

 

Lesson 2: There’s something else occurring as a result of streaming that’s critical to understanding the niche musician’s and songwriter’s perspective. It’s that many, if not the vast majority of record companies, are no longer advancing money for a lot of music on their labels. It’s now the artists and creators, in countless numbers, who are each sinking tens of thousands of dollars into making their own records. Many still go with a label despite having to front the costs themselves just to be part of a distinguished label roster. There are many fine small labels doing everything they can to make that a worthwhile trade, and some still struggle to front budgets. The point is, those niche labels and independent musicians face either a zero, or statistically insignificant, chance of a return on their investment through streaming. Many report barely paying for a sandwich with their royalties.

 

If one only cares about the top 10% of songs and launching superstars to the stadium echelon, and keeps the blinders on for the rest, I suppose one can claim some successes with streaming. But if one values the wide array of music our country and the world has to offer, then our biggest music corporations have failed us, and failed our culture of music as a whole, by cashing in on Ek’s unsustainable business model. Spotify’s IPO papers confirm to me the streaming model’s income and wealth inequality as well as unsustainability. The 90% knew this years ago.

 

Lesson 3: As I see it, those set to run the show under the current draft MMA have a terrible track record in this arena: The NMPA owned the Harry Fox Agency themselves and was already once tasked with solving the Spotify mechanical issue. In my opinion, that effort failed miserably: the feuding, in-fighting and finger-pointing that occurred between the NMPA, Spotify, and HFA, and the ugly lawsuits brought by independent songwriters and small publishers resulting from what seems to me to be a collective failure to properly handle and respect mechanical royalties, left these companies acting like the Keystone Cops. Yet ironically, it is the NMPA and the Digital Media Association (DiMA – companies like Google, Spotify and Amazon) that, in my view, are steering all power under the MMA to the same cast of characters, while conspicuously avoiding objective oversight and reasonable checks and balances.

 

I have no problem with the NMPA or its members and Spotify being involved in the solution. But I have a HUGE problem with them controlling the solution, and controlling the entities that will be formed under the MMA."

 

Read more from the front-line about it here

and here

 

 

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