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Clemo

Song parts

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Hi Folks

Would anyone list the names of the parts that go to make a song, i.e. Verse chorus, bridge, prose etc

much thanks 

All the best

Mike

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Intro

Verse

Pre-Chorus

Chorus

Bridge

Middle-Eight

Lead (instrument)

Outro

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.... and refrain

 

Or ... start, middle, end ... :ph34r:

 

Or maybe it depends on the genre.

 

anatomy-of-songs.jpg

anatomy-of-more-songs.jpg

anatomy-of-even-more-songs.jpg

 

There ya go! :)

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Hi folks

Thanks  for your responses they are 

Good, 😊

Great, 😄

And very funny 😂

All the best

mike

 

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I think the one thing that can get confusing, and worth calling out, is the difference in terms between the U.S. and the U.K. What the Americans call a Pre-Chorus the Brits would call a bridge. And what the Americans call a Bridge the Brits would call a Middle 8.

 

Hence why Simon and Garfunkel had a massive falling out with their UK label when they released the single "Middle 8 over Troubled Water" and it bombed.

 

What is less known about this pop history fued is that this was the direct cause of Art Garfunkel's decision to make the UK population suffer his song "Bright Eyes" so much that he personally paid his record company to keep printing 7" singles of the damn tune until the Queen had to step in and formally apologise.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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On 2/19/2018 at 01:31, Murphster said:

I think the one thing that can get confusing, and worth calling out, is the difference in terms between the U.S. and the U.K. What the Americans call a Pre-Chorus the Brits would call a bridge. And what the Americans call a Bridge the Brits would call a Middle 8.

Hi Murphster - I think this statement needs calling out as misguided nonsense.

Oh, I see - the post is a joke.

Sorry.

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3 hours ago, Lazz said:

Hi Murphster - I think this statement needs calling out as misguided nonsense.

Oh, I see - the post is a joke.

Sorry.

Actually that bit is quite true. In the UK the bridge is traditionally the part that comes between the verse and the chorus. As with all language now since the rise of the internet terms are merging and people use both, but this has always been the case.

 

When the Beatles talked about the bridge they would be referring to the "Pre-Chorus," and well.worth pointing out because it does cause confusion.

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Traditionally?

 

Traditionally - and this in both UK and US - the bridge is simply the B section of a 32-bar modern chorus. As for "pre-chorus", this is a nonsense term invented by non-musicians.  Traditionally, it seems more often than not to refer simply to the 2-bar or 4-bar turnaround taking us into a new section with a new key area. That little slice of harmonic movement is usually operating in what is usually - traditionally, that is - known as the second ending.  Pop writers do not usually move very far out of one main key area in a song, though, do they?  Not usually they don't.  Hence, when they hear some harmonic device being used effectively to lift emotional intensity into the big deal of what you would call "chorus", they think, "Ooh, that's nice.  I want one of those, whatever it is. Think I'll call it pre-chorus..." Kinda like re-inventing the concept of a wheel but choosing to call it "a bag of chips" because you don't know that it's already been christened "wheel".

 

The difference is not between UK and US in terminology but more between musician and writer of words, and between professional and amateur - although, in truth you can call bits and pieces and chunks and slices of text whatever you choose, just as long as you make something decent and satisfying from them - your finished piece could care less about the naming of its parts and they make no difference to how good it sounds. But it doesn't seem legitimate to speak of "actually" or "traditionally" with such small understanding of actual tradition and common practice among the established communities of working musicians.

 

Use of the term "pre-chorus" is actually, traditionally, taken as indication that a person has much to learn.

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