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Found 13 results

  1. Im_trying

    I know.

    I saw you standing in the dark down those empty lanes I know that things have gotta change between the two of us I know we both've felt the pain I know that we've made mistakes and never learnt Yeah, it's kept me up at nights thinking of you and I oh it hurts me every single time. I saw you crying in the street why'd you run away from me you could tell me how you feel and i'd never judge I know i didn't deserve it back then lacked the courage, the strength didn't stand up for my friend things got bad but that wasn't how i wanted things to end. I wish i could forget it wish i didn't regret it cause every time i think of it makes me wanna cry can't stop those tears can't leave the past behind I know I felt bad so i wanted to apologize no i didn't want you by my side no i didn't want you to sympathize now you didn't know how i felt inside i know thing never worked out but i'm glad i tried *my first try*
  2. There are as many answers to that question as there are songwriters. The reason for that is simple. There is no definitely correct way to write a song! Art is universally understood to be a subjective medium. Every artist creates differently - every consumer interprets differently. To call that vague is an understatement! Perhaps Webster’s should add “art” as one of its’ official definitions for the word “vague”? But for creators of art, that vagueness is both a blessing and a curse. The blessing part is fairly obvious. If there are no absolutes governing creation, then the artist can’t make a mistake…right? With no strict rules, whatever decisions we make are viable…at least in theory. And from a creative standpoint, that is truly a blessing! It means the artist has complete creative freedom! They begin their process with nothing & end it with their interpretation of a finished work. Unfortunately, that same freedom endlessly complicates the creative process. The question asked by the title of this article is merely one example of that. “When Is A Song Finished”? How does a songwriter go about making that decision? Chances are, unless you are a songwriter, that question has never occurred to you. That’s one of the reasons I chose this topic. Hopefully, those of you who don’t write will get a glimpse of what’s behind our mysterious creative curtain. For purposes of the article, the term “song” refers to just the essential elements (lyrics, melody & single instrument accompaniment). Believe it or not, complexities multiply 1,000-fold once you factor in variables like arrangement & production. Honestly, I can feel myself growing older just thinking about it! So, with only 3 song elements to consider, how complicated could this process be? You write some words, a melody for those words & plug-in a backing chord structure. Simple enough, right? Yep! Right up to the point where the writer begins reassessing & fine tuning their work...a necessary part of the process. · Is the meaning/intent of my lyric clear? · Will the average listener understand what my song’s about? · Does the lyrical rhyme scheme work well? Does it contain enough rhymes, or too many? In either case, does it work well with my chosen subject matter, or detract from the message & mood I’m trying to convey? · Does my lyric have a solid, memorable hook? In other words, does it contain a word or phrase that’s catchy, repetitive & will stick in the listener’s head after the song has ended? · Are all my verse sections solid, or should I rewrite the 3rd? It seems weaker than the rest. · Is my title catchy? Will it be easy for people to remember? Is it short enough? Does it effectively convey what my song’s about? · Will other people find my lyric interesting? If not, why not? Does it have wide-ranging appeal, or target a specific listener demographic? Should I change something to make it easier to identify with? · Does the lyrical meter (feel & flow) sound natural when it’s sung? If not, what should I change…the lyrical meter or the way in which it’s sung? · Does the melody work well with my supporting chord structure? “Melody” is the most important of those 3 song elements, so nothing should be allowed to interfere-with or detract-from its’ effectiveness. · Are both musical elements a good match for my lyric? Do all 3 point the listener in the same direction? Do they complement one another, or conflict? · Should I add a bridge section to the song? If so, what type & where should it be placed within the existing structure? · Is the song too long? If so, what can I remove without disturbing the integrity of the overall piece? · Does my song flow naturally from section- to-section, or is the change from verse-to-chorus too abrupt? Should I have written pre-chorus sections, rather than trying to move directly from verse-to-chorus? If it’s not a major issue, might it be address in the arrangement phase, by adding a musical interlude? By now, some of you may be thinking…is he serious? Totally! None of these questions are far-fetched. They represent merely the-tip-of-the songwriting iceberg. This internal battle we wage is a necessary part of the process. But sooner or later, a song has to reach the point of completion….doesn’t it? So, the real question becomes, how much of this examining process should we allow ourselves to do? At what point does it cease being useful & become a neurotic exercise in futility? Once again, there is no single answer. Each writer’s process is different. For me, the process became manageable once I learned to define, control & embrace my own version of it. That’s right, I took the time to… · examine my process · consider my specific goals & motivations as a writer · make realistic assessments of my up-front expectations, the tools I had to work with & my available time. Keeping in mind that there is no such thing as “the perfect song”, I made some simple decisions. · I weighed what I was willing & able to put into a project, against my expectations for the end result. · I tried to achieve a balance between what I was willing to accept & what it would take to get me there. From that, my version of this process was born. Somewhere along the line, I stopped viewing songs as finished or unfinished. I prefer to see them as works-in-progress, at various stages of development. “Finished” has come to mean “finished for now”. Because I also recognize the importance of re-writing, I never rule out the possibility of returning to a project at a later time. I'll close this out with a piece of advice for novice songwriters. Do yourself a favor…figure out what your version of “finished” is going to be. If you wait for inspiration, intuition or divine intervention to decide for you, you could be waiting a very long time. Happy writing everyone! Tom Hoffman "About Me" Muse Member pg. Tune-Smith.com Tom Hoffman YouTube
  3. SongDoor 2017 Winners Announced NASHVILLE, TENN., USA - January 22, 2018 -- The winners of the SongDoor 2017 Int'l. Songwriting Competition have been announced: the Grand Award has gone to David Pellegrini of Maryland for his song, “Lay My Burdens Down,” which also won the Christian category. “The distance between first and second place was only one point,” says Tony Zotta, SongDoor president. “For that reason we would also like to give some special recognition to Simon Finn, the Soft Rock Category winner for his outstanding work on ‘Rewind’. There was particularly fierce competition this year, and the judge’s final scores are certainly indicative of that.” This year's "Staff Favorite" was from a band named The Fine Lines, whose song “Night Town” was a contagious hit amongst the SongDoor employees. The song, written by band members Connor Reed, Shane Coogan, Nik Webster, Vincent Park was a finalist in the Hard Rock/Alt-Rock category. The competition was generously sponsored by SongU.com, Broadjam, Colorado Sound, Steve Avedis, Robin Frederick and MasterWriter. Not just the winners won -- every songwriter who entered this year's competition receives a free 45-day all-access trial to SongU.com, a free Broadjam Film & TV membership as well as free song-editing software to help them improve their skills, a package worth $220 for all entrants. As the winner of this year's Grand Award, David wins a one-year Platinum membership to SongU.com, a full-band demo recorded and engineer by Emmy-winner Steve Avedis cut at the famous Colorado Sound studio in Denver, an Alvarez acoustic guitar, Masterwriter software, a Broadjam Primo membership and a host of other prizes valued at more than $4,900. For more about this year's SongDoor winners, visit http://www.songdoor.com. To hear more of Charlie's music and see his show schedule, visit https://www.reverbnation.com/highwaytoheaven2. Here is a list of all of the winners of the SongDoor 2017 International Songwriting Competition: Grand Award Winner: CHRISTIAN CATEGORY: David Pellegrini | Maryland, USA “Lay My Burdens Down” CATEGORY WINNERS: CHRISTIAN: David Pellegrini | Maryland, USA “Lay My Burdens Down” COUNTRY: James Hoppe/Elle Mears | California, USA “Sip It Off My Lips” INSTRUMENTAL: Hal Dickens/Paul Cassidy | Illinois, USA “Leaving For War” POP: Adam Avery/Christopher Hawthorn | Vermont, USA “What If It's Love” HARD ROCK/ALT-ROCK: Lynn Carey Saylor | California, USA "Tidal Wave" SOFT ROCK/ALT-FOLK: Simon Finn | Stockton-on-Tees, UK “Rewind” SongDoor 2018 is open for submissions on April 15, 2018. The entry fee remains at $10 per song. For more information, visit http://songdoor.com. About SongDoor SongDoor, founded in 2006, is an annual event designed by songwriters, for songwriters. The competition is open to amateur and professional songwriters worldwide. Judges include seasoned music industry producers, artists and engineers who have worked with/for such artists as Britney Spears, Justin Timberlake, Neil Young, Lynrd Skynrd, Jimmy Buffett, Garth Brooks, Keith Urban and many, many others. The awards purse is valued at $12,300. All entrants receive approximately $220 in free songwriting tools, regardless of whether or not they win any of the official awards. ###
  4. Hello, I am a student studying music and for my coursework I need to research professionals musicians who are songwriters. If you have time, I would greatly appreciate it if you could answer this questionnaire. Should not take longer than 3 minutes to complete. Thank you very much. https://goo.gl/forms/hgzaL9XqMnSOX1mr2 P.S If there is any problems with accessing the form, please don't hesitate on messaging.
  5. Hi there, fellow songwriters! So, after a trying month which has included the loss of a loved one and my own major surgery, I'm back with my continuing blog series about the craft and business of songwriting, using interview segments from my book "Nashville Songsmiths - In-Depth Interviews with #1 Country Songwriters" to highlight specific issues pertaining to both the craft and business of songwriting, "From the Mouths of Pros!" I spoke with hit songwriter and swell pal Walt Aldridge ("I Loved Her First," "No Getting Over Me") about song demos. TH: Let’s talk about the way you approach demos. Do you, because you have the expertise in so many areas…I assume that you try to make your demos as much like what you hear the master recording sounding like as possible. WA: I do. And I think most people do. But the difference is that I’m able to converse with the engineers on a one-to-one level, and with the musicians on a one-to-one level. Usually I play on my demos, so I’m on the musician’s side of the glass while it’s being tracked. But I’ve found over the years that it really helps if you can speak with an engineer in terminology that he understands. If you say to him, you know, “I’m looking for more of a transparent sound.” Well, they don’t know what that means. But if you’re able to say to them, “I’m looking for a sound that’s more like an API mic pre with maybe a little real ultra-high frequency added to it”…or something like that, then you’re speaking in their terms. The same thing with musicians – to be able to speak to them in terms of music theory, or sounds, or whatever, and have it be something other than some kind of vague thing that a lot of people speak to them, like, “I’m looking for something with a little more punch to it.” Well, that can be interpreted in a lot of different ways. I have found that it’s helpful to me to sort of participate with everybody, in that I can speak both the languages – technical and musical. TH: Are there any more instances these days of basic vocal/acoustic guitar demos actually getting pitched to an artist, or more often is that pitched to somebody that’s going to make that into a high-quality demo, then pitch it to the artist? WA: I think it depends. I think there are writers that do that. I have never been one of them. I’ve never been one of those guys that really sold the song with just his acoustic guitar. And part of it is the kind of songs that you write. I have to tell you, a big part of songwriting to me is also writing the production of what I envision. I write the intro lick…. I wrote that guitar lick for “No Getting Over Me” on the beginning, and I wrote the guitar lick on the beginning of “The Fear of Being Alone” - and those licks were just as important to me as…those guitar licks had to be there, just as importantly as any of the lyrics or the melody. So, it depends on what kind of writer you are. But I’ve always been a sort of production-oriented writer, who usually had a sort of end record in mind when I wrote the song. For much more, including cool audio clips, just go to www.nashvillesongsmiths.com. If you'd like a PDF or Docx version of the book, just shoot me a message through the CONTACT page! Next time, we'll talk with songwriter Anthony L. Smith ("What About Now," "Tomorrow") about licensing songs for advertising.
  6. Hi, I'm 15 and I've written 150 full and unfinished songs in the past 6 months, and I have a struggle I face every time. When I get a song idea, what I first write usually ends up being the most fitting for the chorus. And that's fine, but what makes me frustrated almost every time is thinking of the verses. I think and write and think and write, but I'm never satisfied and I just never finish the song. So, I'm here to ask if any of you could help me out with this. How do you write a song? Do you start with a chorus or a verse? How do you write a verse? What do you write in a verse? THANK YOU!!!!!
  7. Hi again, fellow Songwriters! This is the third in my continuing blog series about the craft and business of songwriting, using interview segments from my book "Nashville Songsmiths - In-Depth Interviews with #1 Country Songwriters" to highlight specific issues pertaining to both the craft and business of songwriting, "From the Mouths of Pros!" Tons more of this stuff, including audio clips of the interviews and the what-not, at http://nashvillesongsmiths.com/ - shoot me a message from the site and I'll get you a digital text version of the whole book for absolutely nuttin'! (please specify PDF or Docx). These interviews are all close to my heart, and I dig sharing. Billy Montana (Bring on the Rain, More than a Memory) talks about writing songs specifically with an Artist in mind - this one had an unexpected outcome! BM: People ask all the time, “Are you writing specifically for someone, or are you just writing a song?” And my usual response is, “I’m just trying to write the best song I can that day.” Well, we have a thing called a “pitch sheet” that describes, you know, it has the artist’s name, who’s producing them, when they’re going into the studio, and what type of song they think they’re looking for. And so Lee Ann Womack was on that list, and the description of the song she was looking for was “an up-tempo, fun, traditional-sounding country song.” So (co-writer) Jenai and I decided, man, let’s just try for a change to write for an artist specifically, and so we wrote “Suds in the Bucket” with that in mind. And we finished the song and really liked it, and our publisher really liked it. It was a cool thing in writing this song, ‘cause this is a case where we had the music and we had the topic we wanted to write about, but didn’t have a title. And I don’t usually start that way – I usually start with a title ‘cause I like to know where I’m going. ”She left the suds in the bucket and the clothes hangin’ out on the line” just kind of fell out of the sky, and when I said that to my co-writer, she was like, “Oh my gosh, I love that, let’s do that!” It just fit perfectly into the music that we had, and the idea that we had for the song. So we ran with it, finished the song, everybody liked it…and we pitched it to Lee Ann Womack’s camp and they passed on it. Which isn’t unusual, you know, that happens more than not, obviously. But it wasn’t too long after that that the folks in the Sara Evans camp heard the song, and thought it would be perfect for her. And so, she ended up recording it, and man, I thought they did an amazing job. Here's an audio sample of Billy Montana talking about Bring on the Rain. UP NEXT: Walt Aldridge on different demo approaches.
  8. Hi again, fellow Songwriters! This is the second in my continuing blog series about the craft and business of songwriting, using interview segments from my book "Nashville Songsmiths - In-Depth Interviews with #1 Country Songwriters" to highlight specific issues pertaining to both the craft and business of songwriting, "From the Mouths of Pros!" Tons more of this stuff, including audio clips of the interviews and the what-not, at http://nashvillesongsmiths.com/ - shoot me a message from the site and I'll get you a digital text version of the whole book for absolutely nuttin'! (please specify PDF or Docx). These interviews are all close to my heart, and I dig sharing. Even after a multitude of #1 smashes, from Brooks & Dunn's "Ain't Nothing About You," to Brad Paisley's "When I Get Where I'm Goin'," to Kenny Chesney's "Living in Fast Forward," Rivers Rutherford STILL has days filled with doubt... RR: You know, some days for me…months’ll go by and nothing sounds like a song. And then I’ll have a week or so where everything everybody says sounds like a song. It’s really funny how that works. And then I’ll start writing a bunch of songs that I really like…and I’ll dream ‘em, and everything else. And then all of a sudden it stops, and I’m back to slaving away, tryin’ to make it happen again. You start getting scared that it’s never gonna come back again. TH: Do you really? Is there a point where you think you’ve written your last hit? RR: Absolutely. I’ve thought that so many times, I can’t even count it…I thought that when I was twenty-two. I thought I’d written my last song. But it always seems to come back around, you know? I think the older I get the more I realize, it’s in there, I’ve got plenty to say. As long as I show up and do the work, kinda roll up my sleeves and dive in, sooner or later something’ll percolate. TH: So you force yourself to write? RR: Yes. I don’t feel like it every day, but I do it every day. There are days that I can’t wait to get in and write songs, and I don’t write anything good. There are days I’d rather get a root canal than write a song. But I show up and I write hits. There’s just no accounting for it, sometimes it works and sometimes it doesn’t, there’s no rhyme or reason to it, you just gotta be present to win. TH: And you’ve had way more hits than root canals. RR: (laughs) Thankfully. So far anyway. Rivers’ website is www.riversrutherford.com And, lastly, HERE'S a cool interview clip of Rivers talking about "When I Get Where I'm Going," complete with a sample of his demo! https://clyp.it/de5daqt5 I look forward to any comments, and don't forget to request your free PDF or Word Doc of the book!
  9. Gioratal

    Writer's block

    I'm trying to write a song (after a long time) and I'm blocked! Main theme: I'm trying to write about a situation where your life partner is feeling shitty and things are not going well for him/her. You are doing well and work hard for it and you look at your partner and thinks they can do better and they should stop blaming the circumstances for their problems like blaming a force of nature for destroying everything (out of your hand) I want to use the "Force of nature" as a metaphor for "problems" and in overall tell a story from the "Happy" part of this relationship and how this "shitty" weather, can influence and ruin stuff. First draft: Verse 1: Maybe it's the weather, 100 of raindrops in your heart. They say it would get colder but you haven't felt warmth in a very long time. Wake up every morning, and you feel like you left something behind They say it would get harder, but harder is no harder when you're aching all the time. Verse 2: Forces of nature, washing you inside out Laying on a feather, won't get you anywhere. So stop blaming the weather, when you get stuck Forces of nature, washing you inside out. Listen to the demo HERE Here is a link to the project on Kompoz Let me know what you think?
  10. You're writing work flow will never be the same Hi, I know I haven't posted here before, but I've done a ton of reading to get some perspective on a songwriting tool I've been working on (to serve my own workflow). I'm tepidly posting here (in the real world) for the first time. Its in beta right now, but I believe in trial by fire and this place is generally on fire. Watch the intro video (it will literally tell you everything).Please enjoy and destroy Lyrios : acel-watford.com/lyrios/
  11. http://www.kompoz.com/music/collaboration/751832 Lyrics/Melody This is an upbeat love song with pop, electronic, and folk influences. (Think Taylor Swift, Ellie Goulding, Daughter, CHVRCHES) I have the chorus for the song and a verse melody set up but I'm stuck on the rest of the lyrics. Here's what I have so far: Here's me singing it: https://soundcloud.com/nova-albiston/20170411-003a (It's really rough, I know. I haven't had a chance to practice.) ------------------------- You have my heart Don't you leave me Come as you are You're all I need You're all I need ------------------------- And this is the melody I came up with for the verse: https://soundcloud.com/nova-albiston/20170411-001a I would repeat that melody twice (maybe 4 times?? idk) with a lil variation on the second one. I haven't thought of a Pre-chorus melody yet. Instruments/Production My concept for the short album thing I want to make is going to be space aesthetic (because my name is Nova ;D ) so what I want for the instruments is high pitched, twinkly, shimmery sounds. (Harp, wind chimes, music box, xylophone, acoustic guitar, etc) I know how to use Ableton, but I only have the free version and can't afford full version. I have some drum stuff in mind for it too, I'll show it to you if you're interested.
  12. http://www.kompoz.com/music/collaboration/751832 Lyrics/Melody This is an upbeat love song with pop, electronic, and folk influences. (Think Taylor Swift, Ellie Goulding, Daughter, CHVRCHES) I have the chorus for the song and a verse melody set up but I'm stuck on the rest of the lyrics. Here's what I have so far: Here's me singing it: https://soundcloud.com/nova-albiston/20170411-003a (It's really rough, I know. I haven't had a chance to practice.) ------------------------- You have my heart Don't you leave me Come as you are You're all I need You're all I need ------------------------- And this is the melody I came up with for the verse: https://soundcloud.com/nova-albiston/20170411-001a I would repeat that melody twice (maybe 4 times?? idk) with a lil variation on the second one. I haven't thought of a Pre-chorus melody yet. Instruments/Production My concept for the short album thing I want to make is going to be space aesthetic (because my name is Nova ;D ) so what I want for the instruments is high pitched, twinkly, shimmery sounds. (Harp, wind chimes, music box, xylophone, acoustic guitar, etc) I know how to use Ableton, but I only have the free version and can't afford full version. I have some drum stuff in mind for it too, I'll show it to you if you're interested.
  13. http://www.kompoz.com/music/collaboration/751832 Lyrics/Melody This is an upbeat love song with pop, electronic, and folk influences. (Think Taylor Swift, Ellie Goulding, Daughter, CHVRCHES) I have the chorus for the song and a verse melody set up but I'm stuck on the rest of the lyrics. Here's what I have so far: Here's me singing it: https://soundcloud.com/nova-albiston/20170411-003a (It's really rough, I know. I haven't had a chance to practice.) ------------------------- You have my heart Don't you leave me Come as you are You're all I need You're all I need ------------------------- And this is the melody I came up with for the verse: https://soundcloud.com/nova-albiston/20170411-001a I would repeat that melody twice (maybe 4 times?? idk) with a lil variation on the second one. I haven't thought of a Pre-chorus melody yet. Instruments/Production My concept for the short album thing I want to make is going to be space aesthetic (because my name is Nova ;D ) so what I want for the instruments is high pitched, twinkly, shimmery sounds. (Harp, wind chimes, music box, xylophone, acoustic guitar, etc) I know how to use Ableton, but I only have the free version and can't afford full version. I have some drum stuff in mind for it too, I'll show it to you if you're interested.
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