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Lzi

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About Lzi

  • Rank
    Angelz Reign Productions
  • Birthday 07/10/62

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    A sea of Zen!
  • Interests
    Wow...Everything lol...Music of course :)...I love my family. We love to travel.

    "From one thing know Ten-Thousand things">----------Miyamoto Musashi

Previous Fields

  • Lyricist, Composer or Both?
    music and lyrics
  • Musical Influences?
    way too many to list in this box
  1. When I lived in the DC suburbs my guitars reacted to weather changes but, I'm fairly certain it had a lot to do with the high humidity this area is famous for having. Here in San Diego, I have no problems whatsoever. Our weather is notorious for never changing (I'm not complaining). I do now use humidifiers with my acoustics as, it can sometimes tend towards being on the dry side here until winter brings the rains(If this is winter, I'm a snowflake). Rainsong acoustics sound a bit "brittle" to my ears. They sound like they aren't made out of wood (not a good thing for me). Never could stand Ovation guitars either. Try keeping your guitars in their cases. I know, I have an older Taylor 310 model dreadnought which I just leave leaning aginst the wall wherever I might put it down. The guitar almost never rests in it's case, stays in tune lioke a champ, great intonation. It just keeps sounding better, and better the more it gets played. Who knows? Maybe because, they make Taylor guitars right down the street from where we live they are more comfortable in this climate? I'd get a soundhole humidifier if I were you. Here the humidity is pretty near perfect most of the time (40-50 percent). Heating dries out acoustic guitars over time if, they are not properly cared for. It might not seem as if this is happening, but it is a gradual thing. Better safe than sorry.
  2. I have an Axiom 25. I love the keys. It's the perfect midi controller for a non-keyboard player. It depends upon what you want to do with it, if, you want to create drum tracks, it is near perfect. I lent mine to the kid I am working with right now. He loves it. A pro DJ friend of mine has an Axiom 25 sitting next to his left turntable. It's solid gear, that's for sure, I've worked this one to death for about six years. You cannot go wrong with this midi controller for your home studio. Mine has attained workhorse status. There are Axiom controllers available with more than 25 keys or, there used to be.
  3. I have been working a lot latelywith an artist who uses Logic at home. I am seriously considering diving in head first with Logic Pro. I use Pro Tools at home, and the artist above and I have been working together in an outside studio which is Pro Tools but, I swear, when we are at his house cutting demo vocals, and using Logic Express that, I do not find very much difference in the two programs at all. Now, I know there are many so...I would love to see your Logic tips video. I think the big difference is the much lower cost of Logic.
  4. Welcome to the wonderful world of hearing things that others don't even notice. Remember though; most of those who listen to your music will not listen with wide open ears. Most today listen to music as a sort of background noise/tapestry. Do not allow this ability to hear tiny sounds to frustrate you. Learn to use this ability. The study of frequencies (listening study) will be greatly beneficial for you. The more you train your hearing, the better your recordings will beome. This is where the most difference can be made in anyone's recordings. Recording is the art of listening. Listen better, make better recordings. This type of training bridges the gaps which a lot of people try to bridge using technology/software but, this path is a dead end. Listening is both the art and the science of recording, all of the rest is much less important. If you can hear MP3 artifacts distinctly then you are an excellent candidate for advanced ear training. Go for it, jump into the pool, you'll be very happy that you did. "Fiddling" is the beginning of understanding...Keep it up!
  5. I wrote a country rock song/female vocal the other day in almost the exact manner you describe in the quoted post above. I remembered you talking about your writing style, and had to come and post myself. Ya know, this isn't the only way I write BUT...If, I am writing alone, this is my favored writing style no matter the genre. I've always found coming up with short catchy riffs was one of my strongest musical strengths. Arrangement comes quite naturally to me as well. This may very well be the result of having written in the manner you describe for well over twenty years. I can go from playing a down tuned Bb shugga chugga metal tune to playing a country tune on a tele through a Deluxe, and just as quickly turn the switch again and write delicate acoustic guitar, singer songwriter type material in alternate tunnings. I absolutely love music. To me, the genre names might as well be Martian, I just use them because, you kinda have to but, I've never liked that. To me Rock, Rap, Blues, Country, anything is only the sound of how the songwriters feel brought to life...Of course every song sounds different, they were written by different people.Terms such as Rock, rap etc cannot, in my opinion get close to actually describing the emotional content of music, that is beyond words...It is one persons feelings, and when it is done right, the music will sound exactly how the writer feels....
  6. Hi rudebwoy,and welcome to the Muse. Perhaps this might help your point of reference. i do write music as well. However, I have collaborated with lyricists here on the Muse. When I listen to their words, to me they are not just words on paper. Besides emotionally hitting me with their story, the words have to have a rhythm that i too can feel. There is no instrumentation needed to feel rhythm. Listen to some well know singers and how they phrase everything. What i'm saying is don't treat your lyrics as just words. Sing them to yourself. I hate the sound of my voice, but I can imagine my favorite singer singing my lyrics. Try it. Maybe it will help. You just said a mouthful Danny!...STORY (must have this)...RHYTHM...FEEL...What else do you need? A good singer requires no music, no pitch reference, they just need a story to tell which they can feel...I have watched this occurr more times than just once...Give a good singer a great song and they will almost always sing beyond their abilities. It's not magic but, I don't think "Magic" is too far off of the mark...Very well said Danny. It's the song...It's always the song...Without the song what good is the singer? What would you make a recording of without the song? The "song" is not the music, the song lives in the vocals. A singer who cannot sing without music isn't much of a singer...Just sayin' When I play guitar I know which notes and chords I am playing. If a singer doesn't know their instrument.... Well what does this tell you???
  7. hmmm...Im not a rapper, but know a few...you do need to be in pitch or out of pitch to make your statement. There are notes being hit which are comfortable or uncomfortable to the ear and to rappers, it is intentional. As a non rapper, I thought there was no or little singing involved, but its just a different form. Oh. I agree totally, Charlie. Every sound is a note, but not every progression of notes is something we normally consider to be "musical" - like spoken words are not normally viewed as "musical." The notes rapped are not really "musical" in that sense, but they are also not like naturally spoken words. I view rapped notes kind of like drums. Most, but not all, rapped notes are of short duration, like a drum sound, and they're intended to provide a vocal rhythm and beat more so than a true melody. Yet, though they're not truly melodic like notes being sung, like drums, rapped notes do have a subtle melodic aspect to them, and that subtle melody can be manipulated in different ways depending on the rap, like the "melody" played on drums can be manipulated by the tuning and the size of the drum and the way they are played. Anyway, I stand by my statement that you don't have to be able to sing to rap. But, I will clarify that I in no way meant to imply that anyone can rap. Rapping takes talent and skill to do well, and I sure as hell can't do it worth a damn. I can speak on rap from the standpoint of a person who is involved in the creation of this artform. Yes, rapping requires skill. Sure, anyone can, or almost anyone can spit out a Dr. Suess style rap but, that is not really rap, it's usually someone who doesn't understand rap at all attempting to make fun of someone who does rap. Let's not get it twisted though, serios rap requires a sewrious skill set. Rap essentially is spoklen word poetry over a musical backdrop. I know some will shudder to call it musical but, to really understand rap you must wear the shhoes of those who do understand the artform. The inner-city is filled with lots and lots of noises hich never cease...Police sirens, buses, trains, subways, major traffic which doesn't ever cease. From this palette of cacophony rap/hip hop springs to life. The sounds of the streets are the sounds of rap, it is the art of the story- teller plain and simply put. Is rap music? No. You don't have to have music to rap. Rapping is a vocal art. There is something that certain rapperes have which truthfully, most do not, and that is a great delivery and vocal tone. It's true, there are 10 million people who "think" they can rap simply because they can spit out rhymes like Dr. Suess...so what? I can do this all day long, I'm a song writer but, this doesn't make me a rapper. I can sing circles around 99.999% of the rappers in the world but, I can't rap, and even though I am involved in the creation of rap, and understand the art quite well I am amazed at the lyrical/poetic skill which SOME rappers have. I am a poet as well as a song writer. Still, poetry is not rap, even though, I consider rapping to be poetry (in some cases anyway). it's a hard thing to nail down, it truly is. Yes, each word spoken is spoken at a certain frequency and this by definition IS a "musical" note, and yes, you can take the time to coach a rapper into hitting these "notes" where they should be. Taking this time isn't going to win you any popularity contests with the rapper though. Hip hop happens almost at the speed of light...And this is where you can make the most difference. IF (and that's a HUGE word IMO) you can make the artist understand that your art is to bring their art to life AND you cannot do what you do at the speed of light AND they are open to understanding your art THEN you can make magic, otherwise you are probably just helping to create another "masterpiece which only fiften people will ever hear. MOST rappers have almost no musical education. Blame the public school system for getting rid of musical education...Do you think rap souns unmusical now...Wait a few years! The "rap" which most people say they can't stand is the product of everyone having the power to make records now...So, if you say tht you're all for the digital recording revolution then, you are a part of rap whether you like it or not because, digital recording makes it possible for people who have no musical education to in effect make music, and you can't have your cake unless everyone else gets their very own piece of it as well. It's music making for the masses. Yeah, it gets quite noisy at timne but lord knows that isn't just a genre known as rap's fault, there is a ton of stuff out there now that's just plain junk. Some rap sucks air...Some rap is brillint...Same goes for country...rock...whatever. So here's the trick if you are a rapper and you want a true edge on all of the so-called rappers of the world (or even NYC lol)...Find yourself a good piano teacher and learn about music.
  8. I love it! Good stuff I dunno man, I'll do my best to explain what IMHO defies explaination... I have always had the ability to hear music "inside of my head." I have also always had the ability to see colors "in my head" as I listen to music though, until recently I never told anyone about this as I thought they might think me insane lol...Once I have at a clear idea of what my harmonic structure will be, I can listen "inside of my head." I simply write lyric to this...Now, this is not the only way that I write. Often I'll begin with a cool riff and a title. Sometimes, I write chorus/hook first, especially if I began from a title. If I am writing with someone else I do my absolute best to feel what they are trying to say before I get involved with their lyric. I believe having a title before you begin helps to write lyric. If there is no title things tend to go all over the place. One way of writing which I do not like to undertake is to write to an existing lyric or, trying to use someone's poetry as a lyric. Write poetry and use it as an inspiration for a lyric but, a poem, generally speaking is a poor lyric IMHO, not to mention, poets tend to get pissy when I change their original poetry. A song and a poem are not the same animal. A song can inspire a poem, or, a poem can inspire a song but, I will NOT write music using someone's poetry as a lyric...NO THANKS! THAT is a major can-of-worms I prefer to always stay away from, in fact it is one of my unwritten rules. Then, there is what I consider to be the very best way...The best songs IMHO anyway, just come flying out of me faster than I can write them down. These are always the very best songs...No fancy recording tricks involved I think this is a GREAT question for this forum. Some may ask the question; What does songwriting have to do with recording...Um, the song is the most important piece of the pie so, how about ALMOST EVERYTHING for an answer!? It's certainly not the technology of recording (boring) that is the be all, end all of recording...Without songs what the hell are we rcording? lol. If the song(s) isn't/aren't right yet, we're in the wrong place because, it's never time to record until the song is da bomb baby! You cannot fix a bad song with recording technology, you just can't, you can make a better arrangement by slicing and dicing stuff but, that won't cut it if what you are after is a great song...Arrangement is only part of this equation. Like I said earlier, IMHO the best way is no way...The best formula is always no-formula...See Tidepool's awesome poem above
  9. The build look clean for sure Danny (my good friend in Md builds custom DAWS). Your set-up looks good...Nice work. Danny, your new et-up look great.
  10. I agree. They can be useful for showing what the EQ can do, but actually expecting the preset to be useful for shaping your specific tone... Yes! If someone needs an Eq education then chhecking out presets can help but, the truth is, every source is. a unique voice, and should be treated in this manner. You bought what amounts to a "lemon" my friend. There are favored models, speakers etc...I don't know much about Vox amps other than I like the AC 30. I'm mostly a Marshall (modded) guy. I tend to prefer using AC30 models (if I'm using models). Granted, I don't use the typcal AC30 tone, I push them into meltdown (makes for a great rock lead tone). I like the way 2 12's sound as opposed to 4X12's sometimes. They cut better. I use 4x12's if I want a huge bottom for the guitars, like some metal stuff tends to be nowadays, with the subharmonics on the guitars rather than the kick. Other than the chugga chugga, palm mute chording stuff, I like 2X12 cabinets because, they slice through the lo-mid muck much easier. I like the way 2 12's present the midrange, it is much more "alive" to me. If you want a great AC 30, look for one which has Alnico "blue" 12's in it...Yeah man! Or, try the Celstion Gold 12' speaks...They are pricey but, WOW do they sound gorgeous. The mids are spectacular. The original Top Boost Model is highly sought after. Ditto...ABSOLUTELY! Lol Im sorry all Vox owners I just had to say it and the truth is I was really surprised when I saw they where back in production. Well who knows maby it was my amp that sucked, think it was the AC 15 I had not sure though its a loooong time ago. I hear you...The reissuses aren't the same. It's like these clone Neve preamps...They sound like brand new 1073's but, the tone everyone is searching for is, the tone of an older 1073. Aged electronic sound vastly different than brand new electronics. It's the same with speakers. A vintage alnico "blue" speaker will sound mellower, less edgy than, newer speakers even though the specs may be identical. I believe, speakers take on the personality of the player who plays through them all of the time, it "get's used to" the frequencies favored by the player over time. I believe guitars are much the same. If you play a guitar which someone played, whose style was similar to yours then, the guitar will seem "magical" to you whereas, if someone plays it who plays a completely different style, the guitar won't react in the same way, and won't seem a bit "magical" at all. Just my 2 cents worth FWIW AC15's sound totally different than AC 30's...1X12=A more boxy tone. If you want an AC 30 sound don't settle for an AC 15...If you like the AC 15 tone, don't get an AC 30...Pretty simple BUT do not think that every amp is going to sound the same...Buy the amp that you played through, never settle for "one from the wrehouse." Same with guitars...Buy the guitar that you played, not one that looks exactly the same. Looks don't make sound. About the vox I think they actually did sound just as bad as I say here both 15 and the 30 lol. The new line they put in production might sound different though I dont know about that. Probably they just bought the name and put out a completely different amp on the market but saying it was the same since vintage do sell. Its probably the same as with the Hagstrom guitars which sucked everyone of them back then when the factory still was located here in sweden. Poor copies of Gibson they where but probably the new line of products they put out today are very good guitars. I don't know about the reissues, they probably are just as you say, a new amp which someone placed the VOX name on after they purchased the rights to it...Who knows man...We live in an age of copies, models, and supposed sound-a-likes so, what should we expect...greatness? I have come to expect mediocrity, not only in gear but, also from todays musician's. It is symptomatic of the disease we call cloning. Everyone sems to adore the fact that they can use a model of the same amp their hero uses, and grab a cheap copy of their favorite guitar and scream about it sounding "excatly the same!" LOL... Carbon copies never have the same brilliance as an original...As it works with paper so, it is with music today.
  11. I agree. They can be useful for showing what the EQ can do, but actually expecting the preset to be useful for shaping your specific tone... Yes! If someone needs an Eq education then chhecking out presets can help but, the truth is, every source is. a unique voice, and should be treated in this manner. You bought what amounts to a "lemon" my friend. There are favored models, speakers etc...I don't know much about Vox amps other than I like the AC 30. I'm mostly a Marshall (modded) guy. I tend to prefer using AC30 models (if I'm using models). Granted, I don't use the typcal AC30 tone, I push them into meltdown (makes for a great rock lead tone). I like the way 2 12's sound as opposed to 4X12's sometimes. They cut better. I use 4x12's if I want a huge bottom for the guitars, like some metal stuff tends to be nowadays, with the subharmonics on the guitars rather than the kick. Other than the chugga chugga, palm mute chording stuff, I like 2X12 cabinets because, they slice through the lo-mid muck much easier. I like the way 2 12's present the midrange, it is much more "alive" to me. If you want a great AC 30, look for one which has Alnico "blue" 12's in it...Yeah man! Or, try the Celstion Gold 12' speaks...They are pricey but, WOW do they sound gorgeous. The mids are spectacular. The original Top Boost Model is highly sought after. Ditto...ABSOLUTELY! Lol Im sorry all Vox owners I just had to say it and the truth is I was really surprised when I saw they where back in production. Well who knows maby it was my amp that sucked, think it was the AC 15 I had not sure though its a loooong time ago. I hear you...The reissuses aren't the same. It's like these clone Neve preamps...They sound like brand new 1073's but, the tone everyone is searching for is, the tone of an older 1073. Aged electronic sound vastly different than brand new electronics. It's the same with speakers. A vintage alnico "blue" speaker will sound mellower, less edgy than, newer speakers even though the specs may be identical. I believe, speakers take on the personality of the player who plays through them all of the time, it "get's used to" the frequencies favored by the player over time. I believe guitars are much the same. If you play a guitar which someone played, whose style was similar to yours then, the guitar will seem "magical" to you whereas, if someone plays it who plays a completely different style, the guitar won't react in the same way, and won't seem a bit "magical" at all. Just my 2 cents worth FWIW AC15's sound totally different than AC 30's...1X12=A more boxy tone. If you want an AC 30 sound don't settle for an AC 15...If you like the AC 15 tone, don't get an AC 30...Pretty simple BUT do not think that every amp is going to sound the same...Buy the amp that you played through, never settle for "one from the wrehouse." Same with guitars...Buy the guitar that you played, not one that looks exactly the same. Looks don't make sound.
  12. I get the reason why people like to have "star" player's settings. Many say it takes the guess work out of the equation. My thing is, "guess work" implies that, someone has no clear idea how Zakk gets his sound in the first place, and other than having Zakk's presets, won't ever be able to come close to cloning Zakk's sound. This right here tells me that a person isn't even trying to understand sound, they just want to be able to call it up when they want it. This right here is the trouble with everyone and their mother's cat having the ability to record music. It's akin to everyone being able to build their own space shuttle without having any knowledge of how to fly the thing. If a person wants to "engineer sound" don't you think they should have somewhat of an undrstanding of how to create sounds of their own or, do you believe that it doesn't matter as long as you can just push a button and get close? Shouldn't an "engineer" be able to engineer his own version of a Zakk Wylde sound using his ears? Myself, I am not a preset kind of guy. I find Eq presets especially funny. Man, if you can't use an Eq without relying on presets this should tell you that your "enginner" ears need further education. "Preset land" only keeps novices from becoming anything other than novices. That's the way an engineer friend of mine puts it, and IMO he's hitting dead-on, center target. I'm not convinced that because, a model calls itself after a famous amp that it actually sounds anything like one. If you want an AC 15 man, buy the real McCoy. You'll be so much happier than you will with someone's model of an AC 15. A model of an AC 15 is no AC 15 ...Not even close. Don't listen to me, record a pass with an AC 15 model...Now record a pass with a real AC 15 miked up and listen. The real amp track will have so much more life to it...Now get up and come out of the "sweet spot" and walk away from your monitors. As you move away from the monitors the modeled track just won't have the same "punch" as the real amp track will, and when you are 10 feet from your monitors you will still easily distinguish the amp track...The modeled track however, won't have the same clarity when you are not sitting in the nearfield. Modeled sounds don't have the same, shall we call it, "staying power" as real amp tracks, they just don't. Some will hear this, some will not. Because 90% of the population cannot distinguish a difference does not instantly imply that no difference exists because, most cannot hear a difference. And, even though these 90% say there is no difference, not one of them in a blind test would choose a track with modeled amps over a track which uses real amps. The "livliness" of the real amps willl win their ears over every time simply because, the real takes will sound much better. Those who say they hear no difference say so simply because, in their heart they want to believe that there is no difference...When it comes to an actual battle betwen a $300 amp modeler and a $3,000 amp...There is no contest but, of course having all of these models gives a person a sense of empowerment...BUT you do not really have a room full of amps...Just an amp modeler...There is a huge difference. And yes, it's a remarkable difference. This profiling stuff is closing the gap between modeled amps and the real thing. You cannot get a rel Marshall tone by pushing buttons and tweaking knobs, you might think you can but, you cannot. The only way to get the tone of a real amp is to use a real amp. I know everyone wishes this wasn't the truth but, it is the truth. Modelers do not react anything like a real amp, they just don't. Ever tried to get an amp modeler to feed back? It sounds atrocious in comparison to th=e real animal, it just does..."PLASTIC" is IMO... a great way to describe the way amp models sound compared to the real McCoy. Wishful thinking can go a loooooong ways though...Just in the wrong direction. lol
  13. I don't have a notion that you think anything dude, though you seem to have one about what I think. I am not saying that you think that an amp profile will make you sound like anyone other than yourself. What I did say was, and I only used Zakk as an example, was that, a player's settings and amp will not give you their sound. As for a Twin Reverb making a player sound "more country." Dude, again, the amp will only reproduce what you play into it. If someone doesn't play "country" then a Twin isn't going to make them all of the sudden, sound like a country player, it just doesn't work like that man.. No amp, I don't care if Leo Fender himself wired it, is going to make you sound "country." Yes, a Twin lends itself to this tone BUT, the player has to play "country" in order to sound that way. I can make a Twin scream, I've done it. Trust me, a Twin doesn't have to sound "country. It's the same thing as writing songs, I CAN write a "country" song but, I'm a city boy so, if I write a "country" song and I perform it, the song won't have that country vibe because, I'm not a country boy. A Marshall won't make you sound more "rock" either, nope, not unless you already sound "rock" without it. A "country player playing into a Marshall isn't going to sound like Judas Priest, even if he uses KK Downing's amp, his guitar and the amp is tweaked to KK's liking...Sorry, won't happen man. Even if he tried to "rock" he will only get so close to a "rock" sound if he's a "country" player. It's not rocket science man.
  14. If you don't play anything like another player, why would you want a profiled sound of his entire set-up AND with his/her exact settings? Unless you understand that a players sound has very little to do with the gear they use then, it is pointless to even try to explain it to you. A players sound ia mostly in his hands, and how he plays the instrument. For instance, Hendrix could play a strat or, he could play a flying v, and it made no real difference, it still sounded like Jimi playing. An amp has no real "sound" of it's own. If you play through it, and I play through it, the resulting sounds which come out of the amp will tell you this better than I ever could. When you play, it'll sound like you. When I play it'll sound like me. It's just the way it is. Amps lend themselves more to certain styles than to others, and this is pretty much much all there is to know about amps IMO. A Twin won't make you sound like a country player unless you already are a country player. A Boogie 3XRectifier won't make you sound like a rocker unless you already are a rocker, it's pretty simple. and, no amp, no matter how it's controls are set-up is going to make you sound like anyone other than yourself. So what would be the point? You can sound like you through anything. You'd sound like you on a $100 beater acoustic and a $10,000 live rig. Same rig, same player, same sound. Same rig, different player, different sound...And this will be true everytime.
  15. Alstair, have you listened to recordings made at 192 in comparison to those made at 44.1 thru a good DAC (Benchmark etc)? Oh, there is a difference. Will this difference translate though after it becomes an mp3 file or, even a CD at 16bit/44.1? The answer to this question depends on many variables. You can hear "better" at 192 than you can at 44.1 for sure. This being true, it is up to how well educated your ears are whether or not you can hear the difference once the 192 file is bounced down to whatever sample rate it winds up at. So, if you hear better at 192, your recording CAN potentially sound better but, this has more to do with listening skill than sample rate. Everything winds up as an mp3. How well you listened can and does make a tremendous differnce...Is 192K worth the extra money? Depends on who is spending it, and what their needs are.