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Placements of hit tracks on albums rooted in vinyl era

childed

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Establishing the track number for the album's title song might be one of he most vital things in production. Historically, sound engineers had two main reasons to put the main track in the middle of a record. First of all, the vinyl's edge was far too quick to get worn out, so putting the hit songs at the top of the tracklist was out of the question. Secondly, the vinyl's circular middle was known to have a poorer sound due to its perimeter.

 

What started as a practical solution has eventually grown into a trend that is still more or less being followed to this day, with the majority of modern artists choosing to place their title songs between 3rd and 5th on the tracklist.


One notable example of this trend is Led Zeppelin's album III, with its hit song 'Since I've Been Loving You' holding the 4th place:

 

 

 

 

The Beatles' 'Lucy In The Sky With Diamonds' is placed 3rd on the album 'Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band'

 

 

 

 

MusicTales.club

 



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Was it necessary to link a few more sentences on another site, rather than just post this here?

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37 minutes ago, Mike B said:

Was it necessary to link a few more sentences on another site, rather than just post this here?

fixed, thanks

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Interesting.  Thanks for sharing.  I'm not sure that the two albums you cite are very good examples though.  Both of the albums contain great music throughout.  They are basically filled with hits IMO.  Maybe they weren't seen that way when they came out?  I did notice that the Shocking Blue album in your other post shows "Venus" as being in the middle of Side A though.

 

You said: "First of all, the vinyl's edge was far too quick to get worn out, so putting the hit songs at the top of the tracklist was out of the question. Secondly, the vinyl's circular middle was known to have a poorer sound due to its perimeter."

 

I'm not meaning to question the premise of this blog, I have a few questions that I ask for clarification.  I have access to a big record collection (my father's, 3-400 albums) which he played constantly until cds came out.  I have to say, that I can't think of one instance in which the vinyl's edge wore out.  Do you mean the first part of the first track when you say "edge"?  Also it would be helpful for you to explain why there is a poorer sound due to it's perimeter.  Don't the vast majority of record players have an automatic arm lift feature?  And if they don't wouldn't the perimeter just ruin the needle instead of the record? 

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17 hours ago, Short Order Kook said:

I have to say, that I can't think of one instance in which the vinyl's edge wore out.  Do you mean the first part of the first track when you say "edge"?  Also it would be helpful for you to explain why there is a poorer sound due to it's perimeter.  Don't the vast majority of record players have an automatic arm lift feature?  And if they don't wouldn't the perimeter just ruin the needle instead of the record? 

thanks for reading.
wow, great vinyl collection yoy have!

 

i have read that info in an old mastering engineers handbook.

It is likely that you will have scratches from the outer edge of the disc, since hands often touch here.

Length of circumference inside the disc is much less than on its outer edge. Thus, the quality of the recording is worse, since the same time-fragment is recorded on a track of smaller length.

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